You’re a ‘Priest’ at Work (2)

November 24 You’re a ‘Priest’ at Work  2

In his book Habits of the Heart, sociologist Robert N. Bellah describes three attitudes people have towards their work.

The first group treats it as a job.

When you do this, you see it strictly as a way to make money and pay the bills.

Like the bumper sticker says, ‘I owe, I owe, so off to work I go.’ But if your main focus is on what you receive from your work, you’ll most likely come to resent it.

The second group approaches work as a career.

Here your motivation will be higher, but your focus is on advancement and prestige.

That means, however, when your career isn’t going well it can feel like your self-worth is on the line.

The third group sees their job as their calling.

Now, logically speaking, if there’s a ‘calling’ there must be someone making the call, right?

That someone is God.

You’re not the ‘caller’, you’re the ‘call-ee’, and any work that has meaning, that can be a blessing to people, and fulfils His purposes, is a calling.

A doctor or pastor might get sucked into treating work solely as a means of earning a good income, therefore they see it as just a job.

On the other hand, a janitor may view what he does—making the world a cleaner place—as a calling.

We’re not downgrading the importance of those who stand in pulpits and preach; we’re upgrading the importance of those who serve God forty hours a week in other jobs: teaching, washing dishes, doing laundry, cooking, or serving your fancy dinner.

The main thing is: when the job’s done well, both will hear the commendation, ‘Well done, good and faithful servant’ (Matthew 25:23 NIV).

‘You are a…priesthood.’  1 Peter 2:9 NIV

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